Impact of sodium humate on performance, rumen microbial and faecal egg counts of West African dwarf goats fed cassava peel based diets

  • Ikyume, T. T. Department of Animal Production, Joseph Sarwuan Tarka University, Makurdi, Benue State.
  • Terwase, A., Department of Animal Production, Joseph Sarwuan Tarka University, Makurdi, Benue State.
  • Obi, V. A. Department of Animal Production, Joseph Sarwuan Tarka University, Makurdi, Benue State.
  • Idoko, M.O. Department of Animal Production, Joseph Sarwuan Tarka University, Makurdi, Benue State.
  • Hangem, P.H. Department of Animal Production, Joseph Sarwuan Tarka University, Makurdi, Benue State.
  • Donkoh, D.S. Department of Animal Production, Joseph Sarwuan Tarka University, Makurdi, Benue State.
Keywords: sodium humate, cassava peel, performance, faecal count, WAD goats

Abstract

The problem of cyanide poisoning may be addressed with addition of feed additives with potentials for detoxification. This research was conducted to assess the performance, rumen microbial and faecal egg counts of West African dwarf (WAD) goats fed cassava peel based diets. Twenty WAD bucks were fed cassava peel based diets supplemented with sodium humate at 0, 5, 10 and 15 g/kg diet for a period of 87 days. The experiment was laid out in a completely randomised design. Data was collected on growth performance indices, rumen microbial count, apparent nutrient digestibility and faecal egg count and statistically analysed using SPSS. Results showed addition of sodium humate to cassava peels based diets improved (p<0.05) daily weight gain, feed conversion ratio and dry matter digestibility. Faecal egg count in WAD goats decreased (p<0.05) with addition of sodium humate in the diet. Increasing amount of sodium humate linearly decreased (p<0.05) protozoa count in the rumen of WAD goats. In conclusion, 5 g/kg diet of sodium humate is sufficient to ensure improved performance of WAD goats on cassava peel based diets.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

A.O.A.C. (2005). Official Methods of Analysis. 18th Ed. Association of Official Analytical Chemists, Arlington, Washington, DC., USA.
Agazzi, A., Cigalino, G., Mancin G., Savoini, G. and Dell’Orto, V. (2007). Effects of dietary humates on growth and an aspect of cell-mediated immune response in newbornkids. Small Ruminant Resources, 72:242-245.
Cusack, P.M.V. (2008). Effects of a dietary complex of humic and fulvic acids on the health and production of feed lot cattle des-tined for the Australian domestic market. Australian Veterinary Journal, 86:46-49.
Dehority, B. (1984). Evaluation of subsampling and fixation procedure used for counting rumen protozoa. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 48(1):182-185.
Gensa, U. (2010). Review on Cyanide Poisoning in Ruminants. Journal of Biology, Agriculture and Healthcare, 9:1-12
Hayirl, A., Esenbuga, N., Macit, M., Lacin, E., Karaoglu, M., Karaca, H. and Yildiz, L. (2005). Nutrition practice to alleviate the ad-verse effects of stress on laying performance, metabolic pro-file, and egg quality in peak producing hens: I. The humate supplementation. Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Science, 18:1310-1319
Ikyume T.T., Yusuf, A.O., Oni, A. O., Sowande, O.S., Ikuejamoye‐Omotore, S. and Dansu, S. S. (2021). Performance and Oxidative Stress Biomarkers of West African Dwarf Goats Fed Diet Containing Incremental Sodium Humate. Iranian Journal of Applied Animal Science, 11:123-133
Ikyume, T.T., Oni, A.O., Yusuf, A.O., Sowande, O.S. and Adegbe-hin, S. (2020). Rumen metabolites and microbiome of semi-intensively managed West African Dwarf goats supplemented concentrate diet of varying levels of sodium humate. Egyptian Journal of Veterinary Science, 51(2):263-270.
Ikyume, T.T., Sowande, O.S., Yusuf, A. O., Oni, A. O., Dele, P.A.and Ibrahim, O. T. (2020). In vitro gas production, methane pro-duction and fermentation kinetics of concentrate diet contain-ing incremental levels of sodium humate. Agric. Conspec. Sci. 85(2):183-189.
Islam, K.M.S., Schuhmacher, A. and Grop, J.M. (2005). Humic acid substances in animal agriculture. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition, 4:126-134.
Livestock Resource US (2003). Field trials on Dairy Cattle. Envi-romate Inc., 8571 Boat Club Road, Fort Worth, Texas. Avail-able at: www.livestockrus.com.
Nunes, R.O., Domiciano, G. A., Alves, W. S., Melo, A. C. A., Nogueira, F. C. S., Canellas, L. P., Olivares, F. L., Zingali, R. B. and Soares, M. R. (2019). Evaluation of the effects of humic acids on maize root architecture by label-free proteomics analysis. Scientific Reports, 9:12019
Padmaja, G. and Steinkraus, K. H. (1995). Cyanide detoxification in cassava for food and feed uses. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 35: 299-303
Soto-Blanco, B., S.L. Górniak, S. L. (2010). Toxic effects of prolonged administration of leaves of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) to goats. Experimental Toxicology and Pathology, 62(4):361-366.
SPSS (2011). Statistical Package for Social Sciences Study. SPSS for Windows, Version 20. Chicago SPSS Inc., USA.
Trckova, M., Matlova, L., Hudcova, H., Faldyna, M., Zraly, Z., Dvorska, L., Beran, V. and Pavlik, I. (2005). Peat as a feed supplement for animals: a review. Veterinární Medicína – Czech, 50(8):361-377.
Tweyongyere, R, and Katongole, I. (2002). Cyanogenic potential of cassava peels and their detoxification for utilization as livestock feed. Veterinary Human Toxicology, 44(6):366-369.
Ueno, H. and Goncalves, P. C. (1998). Manual de Diagnóstic opera Helmintoses de Ruminantes .Japan Internaqcional Coorporation Agency. 99
Van Soest, P.J., Robertson, J. B. and Lewis, B. A. (1991). Methods for dietary fiber, neutral detergent fiber and nonstarch poly- saccharides in relation to animal nutrition. Journal of Dairy Science, 74: 3583-3597.
Published
2022-07-07
How to Cite
Ikyume, T. T., Terwase, A., Obi, V. A., Idoko, M.O., Hangem, P.H., & Donkoh, D.S. (2022). Impact of sodium humate on performance, rumen microbial and faecal egg counts of West African dwarf goats fed cassava peel based diets. Nigerian Journal of Animal Science and Technology (NJAST), 5(2), 21 - 27. Retrieved from https://njast.com.ng/index.php/home/article/view/196