Anti-nutrients, Haematology, Serum Chemistry and Digestibility of Broiler Chickens Fed Graded Levels of Cassava Foliage Meal

  • Adedokun, O.O Department of Animal Production and Livestock Management, College of Animal Science and Animal Production, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Abia State.
  • Ewa, E. U. Department of Animal Production and Livestock Management, College of Animal Science and Animal Production, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Abia State.
  • Eburuaja, A.S. Department of Animal Nutrition and Forage Science, College of Animal Science and Animal Production, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Abia State.
  • Akinsola, K.L. Department of Animal Breeding and Physiology, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Abia State.
  • Oketoobo, E.A. Department of Agricultural/Home Science Education, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Abia State.
  • Ojewola, G.S. Department of Animal Nutrition and Forage Science, College of Animal Science and Animal Production, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Abia State.
  • Ahamefule, F.O. Department of Animal Production and Livestock Management, College of Animal Science and Animal Production, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Abia State.
Keywords: Anti-nutrients, Haematology, Serum chemistry, Cassava foliage, Broiler Chickens

Abstract

Anti-nutrients, haematology, serum chemistry and digestibility of broiler chickens fed graded levels of cassava foliage meal (CFM) were investigated. A total of one hundred and fifty (150) Abor Acre strains of broiler chicks were purchased from Agrited Farms Ibadan, Oyo State and raised at the poultry unit of Teaching and Research Farm of Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Abia State. The birds were stabilized for one week using commercial diets after which they were randomly assigned to 5 treatment diets containing 0, 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10% cassava foliage meal (CFM). The variety of cassava used was UMUCASS 36. Each treatment was replicated into 3 with 10 birds per replicate in a completely randomized design experiment. The experiment lasted for 47 days. Feed and water were given ad libitum and drugs and vaccines were administered as at when due. The birds were housed in a deep litter brooding pen at day-old. Data were collected on anti-nutritional factors, haematology, serum chemistry and digestibility. On blood constituents, broiler chickens on diet D2 had the highest values for red blood cells (RBC) (3.58x106/mm3) count, packed cell volume (PCV) (36.02%) and haemoglobin (Hb) (10.70g/dl). Biochemical indices showed significant differences (P<0.05) for total protein and albumin with respective values of 2.98g/dl and 1.27g/l for broiler chickens on diet D1; 4.22g/dl and 2.66g/l in diet D2; 2.52g/dl and 1.21g/l in diet 3, 2.60g/dl and 1.24g/l in diet 4 and 2.45g/dl and 1.18g/l in diet D5. There were significant (P<0.05) differences for all the parameters considered for digestibility except crude fibre. Broiler chickens on diet D2 had the best crude protein digestibility coefficient (81.19%) which is significantly different from D1 (75.61%), D3 (76.07%) and D4 (74.89%) which were similar statistically. The ether extract digestibility followed the trend of crude protein, while ash, nitrogen free extract and dry matter did not follow a particular trend in the treatment groups. There were significant (P<0.05) differences for all the antinutrients considered. The highest content of hydro-cyanide, (HCN) was found in diet D5 (0.435mg/kg) while the least was in control (diet D1) (0.295mg/kg). This is still below the tolerable level recommended for broiler chickens. The phytate followed the trend of the HCN. Phytic acid, chelates calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron and zinc rendering them unavailable to non-ruminant animals.  Broilers on diet D2 (2.5 CFM inclusion) gave the best haematological indices and nutrient utilization and therefore is the recommended level for inclusion into broiler chickens diets.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Adeyemo, G.O. (2008). Effects of cottonseed cake-based diets on haematological and serum biochemistry of egg type chickens, International Journal of Poultry Science, 7(1), 2008,
Agunbiade, J. A., Adeyemi, O. A., Fasina, O. E. and Bagbe, S. A. (2001). Fortification of cassava peel meal in balanceddiets for rabbits, Nigerian Journal of Animal Production. 28: 167 - 173.
Aina, A. B. J. (1990). Replacing maize with cassava peels in finisher rations for cockerels: The effects on cut-up piecesof eviscerated carcass. Nigerian Journal of Animal Production, 17: 1722, 23-27.
Akinmutimi, A. H. (2004). Evaluation of sword bean (Canavaliagladiata) as an alternative feed resource for broiler chicks. Ph.D. Thesis, College of Animal Science and Animal Production, Abia State.
Aletor, V. A. and Egberongbe, O. (1992). Feeding differently processed soybean part 2: An assessment of hematological responses in the chicken’s diet manning. Nahrung. 36 (4): 364 – 369. http://www.ncbi.nih.gov/pubmed/1435 960.
Apata, D.F. and Babalola, T.O. (2012). The use of cassava, sweet potato and cocoyam, and their by-products by non-ruminants. International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition 2(4):54– 62.
Association of Official Analytical Chemists. (AOAC) (2000). Official Methods of Analysis, 17thed. Published by Association of Official Analytical Chemists, Washington, D.C.
Balagopalam, C., Padmaja, G., Nanda, S. and Morthy, S. (1988). Cassava in Food, Feed and Industry In: Global cassava market study- Food and Agriculture Organization. CRC
Chukwuka, O.K, Udedibie, A.B.I, Okeudo, N.J, Aladi, N.O, Esonu, B.O, Iheshiulor, O.O.M and Omede, A.A. 2010. Report and Opinion, 2: 104-110.
Coles, E. H. (1986). Veterinary Clinical Pathology. (4thed). Publisher, W.B. Saunders co.
Eggum B.O. (1970). Blood urea measurement as a technique for assessing protein quality. British Journal of Nutrition. 24 :985-988. http://www.fao.org/docrep/003/t0554e/ t055408.htm
Esonu, B.O. (2000). Animal nutrition and feeding: A functional Approach. Memory press, Esonu, B.O., lheukwumere, F.C., Emenalom, O.O., Uchegbu, M.C and Etuk, E.B. (2002). Performance, Nutrient utilization and organ characteristics of broilers fed Micro desmispuberula leaf meal. Livestock Research for Rural Development, 14 (52)
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). (1990). Food Outlook Global Market Analysis.
Ginny, E. (2015). Healthy Children Learn Better. American School Board Journal. www.asbj.com
Iheukwumere, F. C., Ndubuisi, E. C., Mazi, E. A and Onyekwere, M.U. (2008). Performance, nutrient utilization and organ characteristics of broilers fed cassava leaf meal (Manihot esculenta Crantz), Pakistan Journal of nutrition 7 (1):13-16.
Isikwenu, J. O., Akpodiete, O. J., Emegha, I. O. and Bratter, L. (2000). Effects of dietary fibre (maize cob) levels on growth performance of broiler: Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of Nigerian Society for Animal Production (NSAP), 19th – 23rd March, 2003, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Nigeria, Pp 278.
Iyayi, E.A. and Tewe,O.O. (1994). Serum total protein, Urea, and creatinine levels as indices of quality of cassava diets for pigs, Trop. Vet., 36, 1994, 59-67.
Jaturasitha, S T. Srikanchai, M. Kreuzer, and M. Wicke (2008). Differences in carcass and meat characteristics between chicken indigenous to Northern Thailand (Black-Boned and Thai Native) and Imported Extensive Breeds (Bresse and Rhode Island Red). Poultry Science 87:160–169.
Khajarerm, S. and Khajarerm, J. (1992). Use of Cassava products in poultry feeding, Roots, Tubers, Plantains and Bananasin animal feeding. Kobawila, S. C., Louembe, D., Keleke, S., Hounhouigan, J. and Gamba, C. (2005). Reduction of the cyanide contentduring fermentation of cassava roots and leaves to produce bikedi and ntoba mbodi, two food products from Congo. African Journal of Biotechnology 4 (7), 689 – 696.
Kperegbeyi J. I., Meye, J. A. and Ogboi, E. (2009). Local chicken production: strategy of household poultry development in coastal regions of Niger Delta, Nigeria African Journal of General Agriculture, 5 (1) 17 – 20.
Mirtuka, B. M., and Rawnsley, H.M. (1977). Clinical, biochemical and haematological reference value in normal experimental animal, Mason Publishing Value Company New York. Pp 35-50.
Moreki, J. C, Dikeme, R and Poroga, B. (2010). The role of village poultry in food security and HIV/AIDS mitigation in Chobe District of Botswana. Livestock Resource and Rural Development, 22, Article #5, http://www.lrrd.org/lrrd22/3/more220 55.htm.
Nwagu, B.I. (2002). Production and management of indigenous poultry species. A Training Manual in National Training Workshop on Poultry Production in Nigerian National Animal Production Research Institute, Shika, Zaria. 10 – 26pp.
Ojewola, G. S. and Longe, O. G. (1999). Comparative Response and Carcass Composition of Broiler Chickens Fed Various Protein Concentrations. ASAN Conference Proceedings. Pp. 9-2
Okorie, K.C, Nkwocha, G.A, and Ndubuisi, E. C (2011). Implications of feeding varying dietary levels of cassava leaf meal on finisher broilers: performance, carcass haematological and serological profiles. Global Research Journal of Science 1: 58 – 66.
Olurin, K.B., Olojo, E.A.A., and Olukoya,O.A. (2006). Growth of African catfish Clarias Perry, B.D., Randolf, T.F., McDermott, J.J. and Thornton, K.P. (2002). Investing in animal health research to alleviate poverty. ILRI, Nairobi, Kenya, pp: 148.
Ravindran,V., Cabahug G., Ravindran,G., Selle P.H., and Bryden, W.L.(2000). Response of broiler chickens to microbial phytase supplementation as influenced by dietary phytic acid and non-phytate phosphorus levels. II. Effects on apparent metabolizable energy, nutrient digestibility and nutrient retention. British Poultry Science, 41:193-200.
Sebastian, S., Touchburn, S.P., and Chavez E.R. (1998). Implications of phytic acid and supplemental microbial phytase in poultry nutrition: A review. World Poultry Science Journal, 54: 27-47
Saroeun, K. (2010). Feed selection and growth performance of local chickens offered different carbohydrate sources in fresh and dried form supplemented with protein-rich forages. M.Sc. Thesis, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
Shan A.S. and Davis R.H. (1994). Effect of dietary phytate on growth and selenium status of chicks. Talebi A, Asri-Rezaei S, Rozeh-Chai R and Sahraei (2005). Comparative studies on haematological values of broiler strains (Ross, Cobb, Arbor – Acres and Arian) International Journal of Poultry Science, 4 (8): 573-579.
Tewe, O.O. (1991). Detoxification of cassava products and effects of residual toxins on consuming animals. In: Root tubers, Plantain and Banana in Animal Feeding (Editors: D. Ruminant nutrition. Granada Publishers Ltd. New York.
Tewe, O.O. and Egbunike, G.N., (1992). Utilization of cassava in non-ruminant livestock feeds. P.26-34. In: Hahn, K., Reynolds, L. and Egbunike, G.N. (ed.), Proceedings of the IITA/ILCA/University of Ibadan.
Tewe, O.O. (2004). Cassava for livestock feed in sub-Saharan Africa. The global cassava growth strategy. FAO, Rome Italy. Pp. 1-63.
Udedibie A.B.I., Chukwurah, O.J., Enyenihi, G.E., Obikaonu, H.O. and Okoli, I.C. (2012). The use of sun-dried cassava tuber meal, Brewers’ dried grains and palm oil to simulate maize in the diet of laying hens. Journal of Agricultural Technology, 8: 12691276.
Wintrobe, M. N. (1983) Chemical Haemotology, 4th Edition. Pitman Books Ltd.
Published
2021-08-06
How to Cite
Adedokun, O.O, Ewa, E. U., Eburuaja, A.S., Akinsola, K.L., Oketoobo, E.A., Ojewola, G.S., & Ahamefule, F.O. (2021). Anti-nutrients, Haematology, Serum Chemistry and Digestibility of Broiler Chickens Fed Graded Levels of Cassava Foliage Meal . Nigerian Journal of Animal Science and Technology (NJAST), 4(2), 76 - 85. Retrieved from https://njast.com.ng/index.php/home/article/view/149