Gastrointestinal tract pH and gizzard morphometry of Finishing Ross 308 broiler chickens fed diets containing lactic acid bacteria probiotics

  • Guluwa, L. Y. College of Agriculture, Garkawa, P. M.B. 001 Garkawa, Plateau State, Nigeria
  • Wumnokol, D.P. College of Agriculture, Garkawa, P. M.B. 001 Garkawa, Plateau State, Nigeria
  • Dantayi, R. J. College of Agriculture, Garkawa, P. M.B. 001 Garkawa, Plateau State, Nigeria
  • Gulukun, E. Z. College of Agriculture, Garkawa, P. M.B. 001 Garkawa, Plateau State, Nigeria
  • Latu, M. A. College of Agriculture, Garkawa, P. M.B. 001 Garkawa, Plateau State, Nigeria
  • Dalokom, C. Y. College of Agriculture, Garkawa, P. M.B. 001 Garkawa, Plateau State, Nigeria
  • Gyang, I. Y. College of Agriculture, Garkawa, P. M.B. 001 Garkawa, Plateau State, Nigeria
Keywords: Lactic Acid, Bacteria, Probiotic, Mechanical Breakdown, absorption, nutrients

Abstract

Indigenous Lactic acid bacteria probiotic (ILABP) considered in this study are friendly microbes or lactic acid bacteria isolated from the feaces and gastrointestinal tract of local chickens at National Veterinary Research Institute Vom, Nigeria, that are known to have remarkable benefit in animal agriculture. Indigenous Lactic acid bacteria are natural occurring lactic acid bacteria which inhabits the gastrointestinal tract of chickens as targeted environment. Fifty six (56) days feeding trial involving 200 broiler chickens was carried out at the poultry Unit of Plateau State College of Agriculture, Garkawa to evaluate the influence of Indigenous Lactic acid bacteria probiotic on their gastrointestinal pH and gizzard morphometry. Five experimental diets were formulated using least cost feedwin software to incorporate Indigenous Lactic acid bacteria with minimum presence of 0.0 x 108 CFU as treatment 1 and other treatments were 7.2 x 108 CFU L. plantarum, 4.2 x 107 CFU Pediococcus pentosaceous, 1.8 x 108 CFU L. fermentum and combination of L. plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceous and L. fermentum per ml as treatments 2, 3, 4 and 5, respectively. The birds were assigned to these five treatments with 40 birds per treatment replicated four times with ten birds in a completely randomized design. Results of gastrointestinal tract pH parameters revealed no significant changes in the crop, gizzard, small intestine, large intestine and ceacum except proventriculus. Gizzard pH of 3.00 – 3.60 supported the proliferations of lactobacillus species by preventing bacteria entering into the distal intestinal tract due to its low pH. The non significant differences for small and large intestine pH may be an indicator for microbial balance for nutrient absorption for digestion of feed nutrients. This presents ILABP as a promising feed additive in poultry nutrition.  Broiler chickens fed mixture of IMOs L. plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceous and L. fermentum improves gizzard % LW and gizzard thickness for mechanical breakdown of feed to aid uniform mixing, solubility and absorption of nutrients at the small intestine. In conclusion, combination of different beneficial microbes as probiotics (T5) (L. plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceous and L. fermentum) could be used in poultry nutrition to promote gizzard functionality.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Amit-Romach, E., Sklan D. and Uni Z. (2004). ‘Microflora ecology of the chicken intestine using 16S ribosomal DNA primers’. Poultry Science 83:1093-1098.
Brisbin, J. T., Gong, J. and Sharif, S. (2008). Interactions between commensal bacteria and the gut-associated immune system of the chicken. Anim. Health Res. Rev. 9: 101–110.
Corona-Hernandez, R. I., Alvarez-Parrilla, E., Lizardi-Mendoza, J., Islas-Rubio, A. R., de la Rosa, L. A., and Wall-Medrano, A. (2013). Structural stability and viability of microencapsulated probiotic bacteria: a review. Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety 12 (6):614–628.
Ferd, D.J. (1974). The effect of microflora on gastrointestinal pH in the chick. Poult. Sc. 53:115-131.
Gauthier, R. (2002). Intestinal health, the key to productivity (the case of organic acids) XXVII Convention ANECA-WPDSA Puerto Vallarta, Jal. Mexico. 30 April, 2002.
Gbassi, G. K. and Vandamme, T. (2012) Probiotic encapsulation technology: from microencapsulation to release into the gut. Pharmaceutics 4(1):149-163.
Genstat, (2008). Genstat discovery edition 3 for pc/window. Release 7.22 DE VSN International ltd. Htt://discovery.genstat.CO.UK
Guluwa, L. Y., Gambo, D., Alokoson, J. I. and Agbu, C. S (2017) Effect of soaking duration of sweet orange peel meal (Citrus Sinensis) on the Gastrointestinal and organ morphometry of broiler chickens. Production Agriculture and Technology Journal 13(2): 102-106.
Hinton, Jr., A., Buhr, R.J. and Ingram, K.D. (2000) Physical, chemical and microbiological changes in the crop of broiler chickens subjected to incremental feed withdrawal. Poult. Sci., 79: 212-218.
Liong, M.T. and Shah, N.P. (2005) Acid and bile tolerance and cholesterol removal ability of lactobacilli strain. J Dairy Sci. 88: 55-66.
Mabelebele, M., Alabi, O.J., Ng`ambi, J.W., Norris, D. and Ginindza, M.M (2014). Comparison of Gastrointestinal Tracts and pH Values of Digestive Organs of Ross 308 Broiler and Indigenous Venda Chickens Fed the Same Diet. Asian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances, 9: 71-76.
Nkukwana, T.T., Muchenje, V., Masika, P.J. and Mushonga. B. (2015) Intestinal morphology, digestive organ size and digesta pH of broiler chickens fed diets supplemented with or without Moringa oleifera leaf meal. S. Afr. J. Anim. Sci. 45:
Olnood, C. G., Beski, S. S. M., Choct, M and Iji, P. A. (2015) Novel probiotics: Their effects on growth performance, gut development, microbial community and activity of broiler chickens. Animal Nutrition. 1(3): 184-191.
Park, Y. S., Lee, J. Y., Kim, Y. S., and Shin, D. H. (2002) Isolation and characterization of lactic acid bacteria from feces of newborn baby and from dongchimi. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 50: 2531–2536.
Prasad, J., Gill, H., Smart, J., and Gopal, P. K. (1998) Selection and characterisation of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains for use as probiotics. International Dairy Journal. 8: 993–1002.
Rahmani, H.R., Speer, W. and Modirsanei, M. (2005) The effect of intestinal pH on broiler performance and immunity. Int. J. Poult. Sci., 4: 713-717.
Rehman, H.U., Vahjen, W., Awad, W.A. and Zentek, J. (2007) Indigenous bacteria and bacterial metabolic products in the gastrointestinal tract of broiler chickens. Arch Anim Nutrit. (2007) 61:319–35.
Rodrigues, I. and Choct, M. (2018). The foregut and its manipulation via feeding practices in the chicken. Poultry Science 97(9): 3188 – 3288
Sadi T., Jeffey L. S. H., Rahim N., Rashdi A. A., Nejis N. A. and Hassan R. (2006). Bio prospecting and management of microorganisms. National conference on agro biodiversity coŮservation and sustainable utilization. 129–130.
SPSS (2010). Statistical package for Social Science. Release 19.0. User Manual. Microsoft Corp. U. S. A.
Sri-Harimurti., Rahayu, E.S. and Kurniasih (2010). Utilization of indigenous lactic acid bacteria probiotics as a substitute for antibiotic in broiler chickens. Paper presented at the 15th World congress of food science and technology, Cape Town, South Africa, 22–26 Aug 2010.
Yeoman, C.J., Chia, N., Jeraldo, P., Sipos, M., Goldenfeld, N.D. and White, B. A. (2012) The microbiome of the chicken gastrointestinal tract. Anim Health Res Rev. 13:89–99.
Published
2020-08-15
How to Cite
Guluwa, L. Y., Wumnokol, D.P., Dantayi, R. J., Gulukun, E. Z., Latu, M. A., Dalokom, C. Y., & Gyang, I. Y. (2020). Gastrointestinal tract pH and gizzard morphometry of Finishing Ross 308 broiler chickens fed diets containing lactic acid bacteria probiotics. Nigerian Journal of Animal Science and Technology (NJAST), 3(2), 231 - 237. Retrieved from http://njast.com.ng/index.php/home/article/view/98