Effect of Dietary Utilization of Cassava Root (Monihot esculenta) Meal on Growth Performance and Carcass Characteristics of Broiler Chickens at Finisher Phase

  • Tamburawa, M. S. Department of Animal Science Kano University of Science and Technology, Wudil, P.M.B. Kano State, Nigeria.
  • Abubakar, Z. Department of Animal Science Kano University of Science and Technology, Wudil, P.M.B. Kano State, Nigeria.
  • Salisu, N. Department of Animal Health and Production, Binyaminu Usman Polytechnic, School of Agriculture, Hadeja, Jigawa state, Nigeria
  • Wudil, A. A. Department of Animal Science Kano University of Science and Technology, Wudil, P.M.B. Kano State, Nigeria.
  • Hassan, A. M. Department of Animal Science Kano University of Science and Technology, Wudil, P.M.B. Kano State, Nigeria.
  • Ibrahim, U. Department of Animal Science Kano University of Science and Technology, Wudil, P.M.B. Kano State, Nigeria
  • Zango, M.H. Department of Animal Science Kano University of Science and Technology, Wudil, P.M.B. Kano State, Nigeria.
  • Nasir, M. Department of Animal Science Kano University of Science and Technology, Wudil, P.M.B. Kano State, Nigeria.
  • Umar, A. M. Department of Animal Health and Production, Binyaminu Usman Polytechnic, School of Agriculture, Hadeja, Jigawa state, Nigeria
  • Sa’idu, S. S. Department of Animal Science Kano University of Science and Technology, Wudil, P.M.B. Kano State, Nigeria.
Keywords: Broiler chicken, Maize, Cassava root meal, Performance and carcass characteristics

Abstract

This study was conducted to determine the growth performance and carcass characteristics of broiler chickens fed diets containing Cassava Roots Meal (CRM) at finisher phase. A total of ninety (90) four weeks old broiler chicks (Marshal Strain) were used for the study. Five experimental diets were formulated and fed to broiler chickens at dietary levels of 0, 15, 30, 45 and 60% represented as T1, T2, T3, T4 and T5, respectively. The experimental design was a Completely Randomized Design (CRD) and each treatment was replicated 3 times with 6 birds per replicate. The experiment lasted 4 weeks. Data were collected on performance and carcass characteristics. The results of performance showed there were significant differences (P < 0.05) in the final body weight (2083.33-2463.33 g), daily weight gain (55.56-68.27 g) feed conversion ratio, (2.70-3.34) and feed cost/kg gain.(N208.04- 240.09). However, there were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in the initial body weight, daily feed intake and mortality rate. The carcass yields were significantly (p<0.05) affected by dietary inclusion in the final live weight (2083-2463 g), carcass weight (1377.00 -1715.00 g), thigh muscle (141.33-228.00 g), back weight (367.67 - 493.33 g) and dressing percentage (62.44 - 69.61%). The final live weight and dressing percentage were highest in broiler chickens fed T4 (45 % cassava root meal diets). There were significant differences (P<0.05) in proventriculus, gizzard and kidney weights. There were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in liver, heart, lung, spleen and pancreas weights. It was observed that broiler chickens at finisher phase performed better and gave higher values of carcass characteistics at 45% (cassava root meal diet) compared to other treatments. Based on the results of this study, it was concluded that cassava root meal can replace maize up to 45% without any deleterious effect on the growth performance, carcass yield and organs weights of broilers with some reduction in the cost of production.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Adeyemi, O.A., Eruvbetine, D., Oguntona, T., Dipeolu, M.A. and Agunbiade, J.A. (2007). Enhancing the nutritional value of whole cassava root meal by rumen filtrate fermentation. Archivos de Zootecnia 56: 261-264.

Akinmutimi, A.H. (2004). Evaluation of sword beans (Canavaliagladiata) as alternative feed source for broiler chicken. PhD Thesis, MichealOkpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Abia State, Nigeria.

AOAC. (2006). Association of Official Analytical Chemists. Official methods of analysis. (W. Horwitz, Editor) 20th edition, Arlington VA, U.S.A.

Apantaku, S.O. Omotayo, A.M. and Oyesola, A.B.(1998).Poultry farmer’s willingness to participate in Nigerian Agricultural insurance scheme in Ogun state, Nigeria. (editors; oduguwa, O.OFanimo, O. and Osinowo, O.A) processing of the silver 5th Anniversary conference, Nigerian Society for Animal Production. getaway hotel, Abeokuta. 21-26 march 1998, 542

Bamgbose, A. M., Isah, O. A., Sobayo, R. A., Oso, A. O., Okeke, E. N. and Alonge, A.S. (2011). Utilization of bovine Blood rumen digesta mixture based diets by cockerels chicks. In: Proceeding of 36th Annual conference of the Nigerian Society for Animal Production, 13th-16t march, Abuja.pp 391-394.

Banjoko, O.S., Agunbiade, J.A., Awojobi, H.A., Adeyemi, O.A. and Adebayo, M.O. (2008). Nutritional evaluation of layers’ diets based on cassava products and soybean as influenced by protein supplementation and processing. In: Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Conference of the Nigerian Society for Animal Production (NSAP).March 16 - 20, OlabisiOnabanjo University, Nigeria.Pp 373-376.

Dairo, F.A.S., Aina, A., Omoyeni, L. and Adegun, M.K. (2011). Ensiled cassava peel and caged layers’ manure mixture as energy source in broiler starter diet. Journal of Agricultural Science and Technology. 1: 519-524.

Davis A. J, Dale N. M., Rerreira F.J. (2003).Pearl millet as an alternative feed in broiler chickens diets. Journal of Applied Poultry Research: 12:137 – 144.

Eruvbetine, D., Tajudeen, I. D. Adeosun, A. T. and Olojede. A. A. (2003). Cassava (Manihotesculenta) leaf and tuber concentrate in diets for broiler chickens. Bioresource Technology, 86:277 – 281

F.A.O. (1995).Commodity Review and Outlook,1994-1995.Economic and solid Development series. Food and Agricultural Organization. Rome, Italy

F.A.O.(2002).FAO production yearbook volume 56. Food and Agricultural Organization of the united nation.Rome Italy.

F.A.O.(2013). Statistics of Food and Agricultural Organization, Data base P-156, of the United Nation, Rome Italy.

Fanimo, A.O., A.M. Bamgbose, M.O. Abiola, M. Adediran and A.I. Olaniyan, (2005). Carcass Yield and Blood Parameters of Broiler Chicken Fed Melon Husk Diets Supplemented with Yeast. Proc. 1st Nigerian Poultry Summit (NIPS), 20th-25th Feb.

Ofa, Ogun State, Nigeria, pp: 120-124. Heuza, V. and Tran, G. Baslianelli, D,; Archimede, H. and Regner, C. (2014) Cassava root, http//www.feedipedia.org/523.

Kehinde. A.S., Babatude, T.O., Ayoola, O.A. and Temowo, O.O. (2006).Effect of different level of protein on the growth performance characteristics of broiler chicks. In: Proceedings 31st Annual Conference of the Nigerian Society for Animal Production. 12th – 15th March, Bayero University Kano, Nigeria, p 325 – 237.

Longe, O.G. (2006). Poultry: Treasure in chest, an inaugural lecture delivered at the University of Ibadan Nigeria.pp 1-10.

Mandubuike, F.N. and Ekenyem, B.U.(2001); Non-Ruminant livestock production in the Tropics. Gust Chucks Graphic Center, Owerri, Nigeria.Pp 120-145.

Mantilla, J.J. (1976). Utilization of whole Cassava plant in Animal feeding. Paper Presented at the first international symposium on feed composition seminal nutrient Requirements, computerization of diet Lagon, Utah, U.S.A. 11-16 July, 1976. Pp.16

Medugu, C.I., Kwari, I. D.; Igwebuike, J.U. , Mohammed I.D. and Hamker B. (2010).Performance and Economics of production of broiler chickens fed sorghum or millet as replacement for maize in the semiarid one of Nigeria. Agriculture and Biology Journal of North America:1(3):321-5.

Midau, A., Augustine, C., Yakubu, B., Yahaya, S.M., Kibon, A. and Udoyong, A.O. (2011). Effect of enzyme supplemented cassava peel meal on carcass characteristics of broiler chickens. International. Journal of Sustainable Agriculture. 3(1): 1-4.

Obikaonu, H.O. and Udedibie, A.B.I. (2008). Comparative evaluation of ensiled cassava peel meal as substitute for maize on the performance of starter and finisher broilers. Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Conference of the Nigerian Society for Animal Production (NSAP).March 16 - 20. Olabisi Onabanjo University, Nigeria. Pp. 307-310.

Olofin, E.A Nabegu, A.B. and Dambazau, A.M. (2008), Wudil within Kano zone Geographical synthesis, 1st edition, Adamujoji publisher. Department of Geography Kano University of science and technology, Wudil

Onimisi, P.A., Dafwang, I.I. and Omage, J.J. (2008). Growth performance, carcass characteristics and haematological parameters on broiler finisher chickens fed graded level of ginger waste meal. Nigerian Poultry Sci. J. 5(1): 11-17.

SAS (2002) Statistical Analysis System User Guide for Statistics Version 10. SAS institute Inc, Carolina, U.S.A.

Sayre, R. (2007) Transgenic strategies for reducing levels cyanogenic levels in cassava foods, Cassava cyanic Disease Network News 7: 1-2.

Udedibie, A.B.I. (2016) Results of investigation on cassava as possible alternative to maize in Poultry diets In proceeding of NIPOFERD workshop captioned Cassava Utilization in poultry feeding, Asaba, Nigeria. Pp 170-178.

Udoyong, A.O., Kibon, A., Yahaya, S.M., Yakubu, B., Augustine, C. and Isaac, L. (2010). Haematological responses in serum biochemistry of broiler chickens fed graded level of enzyme (Maxigrain®) supplemented cassava peel meal based diet. Global J. Biotech.5(2): 116-119.

Vantsawa PA, Ogundipe SO, Dafwang II, Omage JJ (2007).Replacement value of dusa (locally processed maize offal) for maize in the diets of egg-type chicks (0-8 Weeks). Pak. J. Nutr. 6:530-533.

Zaczek, V., Jones, E.K.M., MacLoed, M.G. and Hocking, P.M. (2003). Dietary fibre improves the welfare of female broiler breeders. Spring Meeting of the World’s Poultry Science Association, United Kingdom Branch- #S31 poster.

Published
2019-10-08
How to Cite
Tamburawa, M. S., Abubakar, Z., Salisu, N., Wudil, A. A., Hassan, A. M., Ibrahim, U., Zango, M.H., Nasir, M., Umar, A. M., & Sa’idu, S. S. (2019). Effect of Dietary Utilization of Cassava Root (Monihot esculenta) Meal on Growth Performance and Carcass Characteristics of Broiler Chickens at Finisher Phase . Nigerian Journal of Animal Science and Technology (NJAST), 2(2), 63-71. Retrieved from http://njast.com.ng/index.php/home/article/view/24